Get Out

Get Out

Get Out

Directed by Jordan Peele.

Comedian Jordan Peele takes a bold shift outside of his comfort zone to produce an intense hypnotic thriller that pulls no punches and is steeped in suspense.

The story involves an interracial couple (Daniel Kaluuya, Allison Williams) who attend a family get together that becomes morbid and sinister before revealing a hidden agenda involving the power of hypnosis and a highly inventive horrifying finale.

Catherine Keener and Bradley Whitford play the elusive parents of Williams's lovebird whose peculiar behavior towards her boyfriend slowly evolves as the film unfolds to reveal its true intentions.  The film that has a lot to say about  racism that is presented in a dream like package.  This is accentuated by a Hitchockian score that heightens during the films skin crawling sequences of psychological and physical terror. The cinematography may not be as vibrant as it could have been but it still achieves the goal of implanting the notion that something is terribly wrong that persists in every scene.  

There are a few flaws, such as a predictable plot and a few generic sequences.  However, the overall execution of the final product delivers an excellent horror film that proves Peele has a lot to offer film lovers.  If there is one regret it is that the stunning hypnosis sequences are few and far between.  

Get Out is a work of fiction that manages to transcend into a shared reality with the viewer. In this world we face a lot of judgment and hostility over our differences. This film brilliantly lays out how it feels to be black in a white setting and how aggressive it can be.

The film itself isn't all scares, there are moments of a humor throughout that ease the tension, but Get Out manages to achieve a balance that maintains itself for the duration, despite a handful of forgivable flaws.  

☆☆☆

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