Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me

1992. Directed by David Lynch.

A prequel and semi-sequel to David Lynch's classic television series, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me debuted at Cannes to a chorus of boos and walk outs.

The film focuses on the final seven days in Laura Palmer's life. In the television program, she is found murdered during the first episode. This film is an examination of her final moments and a harrowing statement on the living hell that victims of incest endure during their everyday lives.

Much like the majority of Lynch's work, Fire Walk With Me is a surreal horror film that takes the concepts of love, family, and small town living and rips off the Rockwell veneer to reveal the festering evils that lay dormant beneath. Sheryl Lee delivers the performance of her career, indulging in the camp of the television show and nihilistic abandon in equal doses. She is a prisoner trapped within the cell of her own reality and there is no way out.

Angelo Badalamenti's score is pure genius, as always. His sounds have a way of eliciting emotional extremes, while also paying homage to the noir films that cultivated the bulk of Lynch's ego scape. They're catchy and memorable in one instant and then shocking and utterly creepy in the next. David Lynch's own song, The Pink Room is especially memorable, perfectly capturing the sleazy interior of Twin Peaks most notorious nightclub.

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David Lynch and Robert Engels' script is massive. it's obvious that there is so much more to this world and the film barely grasps it all. Despite the compelling interactions of the humans, you find yourself wanting more of the spirits and the world of the Black Lodge, but Lynch was not telling that story, and therein lies the major conceit of the film. Audiences were dying for more insight into the mythology of Twin Peaks and answers about Cooper's fate, and Lynch, as usual, had far more devious designs in store. This is the ballad of a dead prom queen who was drowned by her personal demons. Yes, Bob wielded the blade, but much like reality, her misery shut her off from anyone who could have helped her and that, I believe, is the point of Fire Walk With Me.

Available now for digital rental, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me is vintage Lynch. It's an incomplete package that leaves you with more questions than answers, but also delivers a terrifying presentation of all too real monsters that hide among us in plain sight. Essential viewing in preparation for next summer's Twin Peaks revival on Showtime.

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